Wednesday , October 20 2021

Now we have the technology to work on Star Trek shuttle craft



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  • The MIT researchers build the work plan without moving parts
  • Rites on & # 39; ionic winds & # 39; 60 meters
  • "Now the possibilities for this kind of & # 39; of & # 39; propulsion system viable"

The plans to fly without moving parts are now a reality.

Can & # 39; you see them on Star Trek, flying space b & # 39; way silently on ionic winds.

associate professor & # 39; aeronautics and astronautics of & # 39; Steven Barrett checked by MIT when he was kid. And he has now developed the plan & # 39; of his childhood dreams.

Here is in action:

It is the first time that the aircraft is flying without moving parts.

"In the distant future, plans m & # 39; must have propellers and turbines," says Barrett. "They are more like shuttles in & # 39; ' Star Trek ", which only emit a blue glow and silence."

S & # 39; energy is are these lines & # 39; wires wound on the side of & # 39; in front of the model:

"The ionic wind" is generally known as "push electroaerodinamika" and in fact is based on a principle that has been identified for the first time in 1920.

Describing the wind, or pull, which is produced when current passes between thin and thick electrode. If enough voltage is applied, the area between the electrodes can & # 39; produces enough momentum to spur small aircraft.

But in practice, the reality of & # 39; has never progressed beyond hobbyists to remove small models, linked & # 39; large supplies & # 39; voltage, off the bench their work.

Nine & # 39; years ago in & # 39; afternoon at the hotel, Barrett jetlagged red on work behind a & # 39; package to find ways to change in theory & # 39; of & # 39; viable propulsion system.

And recently, in the gymnasium at & # 39; Doupont Athletic Center & # 39; MIT, have a plan b & # 39; length & # 39; 5 meters flying 60 meters without the help of & # 39; moving parts.

They repeated the flight 10 times, a plane repeatedly produce enough thrust to support it at a similar distance every time.

"This was the simplest possible design plan we can & # 39; prove the concept plan & # 39; & # 39 ions can, fly," says Barrett.

"Too little & # 39; away from aircraft can & # 39; to perform useful tasks. It needs to be more efficient, longer fly, and fly away."

Ion, how they work?

Health comes from a stack of & # 39; polymer lithium in the fuselage.

But the key to making this work comes from members of the Group & # 39; Power Electronics Research Professor David Perreault Laboratory of & # 39; Research & # 39; Electronics

They have designed supply & # 39; energy converting the battery output to be able to supply electricity in & # 39; 40,000 volts – enough to carry b & # 39; positive way the wires through & # 39; converter & # 39; lightweight strength.

Here's a technical explanation & # 39; X & # 39; happens after, through the MIT News:

Once the wires are energized, they act to attract and release & # 39; away electrons b & # 39; negative expenditure of molecules & # 39; the surrounding air, like a giant magnet that attracts iron presentations. The molecules & # 39; air left behind are new ionized, and in turn are attracted to the negatively charged electrodes are at the back of the plane.

As the cloud newly formed flow of ions to the blockage wires b & # 39; a negative way, each ion collecting millions & # 39; & # 39 often; other air molecules, and creates thrust to promote the aircraft & # 39; forward.

We have seen before ion drives. NASA has called HiPEP system, and the student & # 39; University & # 39; Sydney Patrick "Paddy" Neumann has a system that wants to use to enable long trips through & # 39; space.

But no one shall fight against gravity.

The team & # 39; & # 39 Barrett can now; go to try to improve the efficiency of their design, to produce more ionic wind b & # 39; less voltage.

"It took a long time to come here", says Barrett. "From the basic principle for something that actually flies had a long journey to characterize the physical, then issue a design and it works.

"Now the possibilities for this kind of & # 39; of & # 39; propulsion system viable."

Here's more video test:

You read more about the test results in the journal Nature.

NOW ISEJN: VIDEOS & # 39; Technical Insider

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