Thursday , June 24 2021

Pictures & # 39; filmed the stunning space Shows "How to Ship & # 39; the Undo Space Our Planet"



"This is real", urged the astronaut Alexander Gerst, who filmed the whole thing from the International Space Station.

Launch & # 39; rocket is always an impressive spectacle to see – if you see the livestream on the Internet or have the privilege to see the event from x & # 39; nowhere near the site of the launch. And, while we have seen a fair share & # 39; memorable rocket launch from Earth, a small number of & # 39; People have the unique opportunity to see these amazing efforts from space.

A gorgeous video shot from the International Space Station (ISS) connects area blast off space & # 39; Into orbit, and demonstrate rocket launch seen on the other side of the line & # 39; Karman – the commonly accepted boundary between Earth's atmosphere and space & # 39; abroad.

The video-timelapse of & # 39; rocket Soyuz-FG launch, filmed from ISS by German Alexander Gerst of astronawtur & # 39; the European Space Agency (ESA) – fill in the missing pieces & # 39; history and spread the unseen aspects of the space normally evade eyes & # 39; observers related World.

According to ESA, the short film was captured on 16 & # 39; in November, when the Soyuz-FG rocket took space to carry the Russian Progress vehicle MS-10. Also known as Progress 71, the cargo ship was sent on a run & # 39; supply to the ISS and was introduced with advanced two days after orbital.

The spectacular view was captured on camera by Gerst, who managed to filter out about 15 minutes starting from 71 Progress cupola window around the space station. Earlier this week, the German astronauts took to Twitter to share the incredible views from space.

"This is real", tweeted Gerst, who runs the ISS as Expedition 57 commander.

The breathtaking timelapse was caught with & # 39; which issued photo room at & # 39; regular intervals and shows the launch in & # 39; about eight to 16 times normal speed.

In the video, the Soyuz rocket can & # 39; seems to leave the planet in a bright flare and then use the Progress cargo ship 71. The key moments of the launch show the separation of the booster -rokit f & # 39; 00: 07, the separation of the first stage in & # 39; 0.19, and the source is deployed Progress vehicle and enter orbit at 00:34 – followed by entry by Soyuz the first stage in the Earth's atmosphere 00:36.

The rocket and its payload rose to heaven from the cosmodrome of & # 39; Baikonur in Kazakhstan at & # 39; 1.1 p.m. TSE & # 39; November 16. The Russian cargo arrived at the ISS on 18 & # 39; November, in which 5652 pounds & # 39; supplies for astronauts to live and work 250 miles above the Earth.

"The space vehicle Progress issued food, fuel and supplies, including over 750 kilograms of & # 39; propellant, 75 kg & # 39; oxygen and air, and 440 liters of water", noted a statement from the ESA.

spacecraft & # 39; Russian Progress docked with the ISS.

spacecraft & # 39; Russian Progress docked with the ISS.

NASA TV

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Wikimedia Commons


This is the first flight & # 39; Soyuz-FG rocket since the accident & # 39; failure led to abortion & # 39; launch in 11 & # 39; October, notes Sputnik News.

"Spatial Progress vehicle was originally scheduled to be launched to the ISS on 30 & # 39; October but the launch was rescheduled for 16 & # 39; November following the abortive launch of 11 & # 39; October.

The accident & # 39; the place last month during the launch of the MS-10 capsule was conducted by, which was attached to the ISS with NASA astronaut and Russian cosmonaut Alexei Nick Hague Ovchinin board. Both astronauts were not worried and managed to land back b & # 39; safely back to Earth minutes after liftoff, Inquisitr reported at that time.

The next launch from Baikonur scheduled to be held on 3 & # 39; December, when the Soyuz capsule MS-11 crew to take & # 39; three members to the space station. The astronauts awaiting the flight is conducted in space are Anne McClain, Roscochos & # 39; Oleg Kononenko and David Saint-Jacques of & # 39; the Canadian Space Agency.


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