Wednesday , December 8 2021

Scientists of & # 39; Harvard Starting an experiment to block out the Sun.



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Total Solar Eclipse. Credit: GettyGetty

Group & # 39; & # 39 scientists; Harvard plan to address climate change through geo-engineering by blocking the sun. The concept of & # 39; sunlight was reflecting artificially & # 39; about tens of & # 39; years, but this will be the first real attempt to control the temperature by the World & # 39; solar engineering.

The project, called Controlled experiment dislocation stratospheric (SCoPEx), will spend $ 3 million to test their models by launching bubble depends on the US southeast & # 39; 20 kilometers into the stratosphere. Once the balloon is in place, will get small particles & # 39; calcium carbonate. The plans are set to start launching from the beginning of spring 2019.

The base about this experiment is the study of the effects of & # 39; major volcanic eruptions on the planet's temperature. In 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines erupted spectacularly, freeing 20 million tonnes of & # 39; sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere. The sulfur dioxide created hose around the Earth stratosphere, cooling the planet b & # 39; & nbsp; 0.5 ° C for about a year and a half.

Engineering Solution to Climate Change

As scientists, government agencies worldwide, and environmental groups are increasingly worried by our collective ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by & # 39; of & # 39; emissions and curb climate change effects, the idea & # 39; Geoengineering solution has become more accepted. The ultimate goal is to reduce heating in the World. It can & # 39; done by reducing greenhouse gas emissions by & # 39; effect & # 39; greenhouse, the sucking CO2 from the atmosphere, or to limit the sunlight reaching the Earth's surface.

The first two methods are discussed and implemented with & # 39; & # 39 actively in, several degrees. The recent commitment of G20 members (with & # 39; the United States as the sole rejection) To – a & # 39; Paris Agreement will act to resolve the source of the problem by reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. Pull CO2 from the atmosphere and ssakkarha in the Earth's crust, called CO2 sequestration, has been implemented and deployed. For example, Royal Dutch Shell& Nbsp; built large facilities & # 39; carbon sequestration with the Canadian and Australian governments.

The third method, which blocks the sunlight was controversial in the scientific community for decades & # 39; years. The controversy lies in the inability to fully understand the consequences of & # 39; partially blocking the sunlight. A reduction in global temperature is well understood and expected, however, remain & # 39; questions & nbsp; the impact of & # 39; this method models & # 39; precipitation, ozone and crop production & # 39; globally.

The illustration of the balloon system the team & # 39; Harvard will use to extract calcium carbonate in the stratosphere.projects.iq.harvard.edu

This is precisely why the team & # 39; research & # 39; Harvard intends spray particles & # 39; tiny chalk (calcium carbonate) in the stratosphere at & # 39; controlled experiment. Computer models can only go to the & # 39; now to predict the impacts of & # 39; this geo-engineering techniques, it is time to test real world. With funding in part by Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, the team & # 39; Harvard starts answering the remaining questions as early as in spring 2019.

While the potential adverse effects are not fully characterized, the ability to control the Earth's temperature by spraying tiny particles in the stratosphere is an attractive solution mainly because of its cost. The recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimated that the continuous release of & # 39; particles in the stratosphere can & # 39; compensate & nbsp;1.5 ° C warming to $ 1 billion to $ 10 billion a year.

When you compare these costs with the overall reduction in the use of fossil fuels or carbon sequestration, the method becomes very attractive. Thus, scientists, government agencies and independent founders & # 39; this technology must balance the cheapest and effectiveness & # 39; this method & # 39; & nbsp; potential risks to the global crop, weather conditions and drought. Ultimately, the only way to fully characterize the risks is to perform real-world experiments, as are boarding the team & # 39; Harvard.

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Total Solar Eclipse. Credit: GettyGetty

Group & # 39; & # 39 scientists; Harvard plans to address climate change through ġeoġinerija by blocking the sun. The concept of & # 39; sunlight was reflecting artificially & # 39; about tens of & # 39; years, but this will be the first real attempt to control the temperature by the World & # 39; solar engineering.

The project, called stratospheric Perturbation Controlled Experiment (SCoPEx), will spend $ 3 million to test their models by launching bubble depends on the United States & # 39; southeast of & # 39; 20 kilometers into the stratosphere. Once the balloon is in place, will get small particles & # 39; calcium carbonate. The plans are set to start launching from the beginning of spring 2019.

The base about this experiment is the study of the effects of & # 39; major volcanic eruptions on the planet's temperature. In 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines erupted spectacularly, and issued 20 million tonnes of & # 39; sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere. The sulfur dioxide created hose across the stratosphere of the World, by cooling the whole planet by & # 39; 0.5 ° C for about a year and a half.

Engineering Solution to Climate Change

As scientists, government agencies worldwide, and environmental groups are increasingly worried by our collective ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by & # 39; of & # 39; emissions and curb climate change effects, the idea & # 39; Geoengineering solution has become more accepted. The ultimate goal is to reduce heating in the World. It can & # 39; done by reducing greenhouse gas emissions by & # 39; effect & # 39; greenhouse, the sucking CO2 from the atmosphere, or to limit the sunlight reaching the Earth's surface.

The first two methods are discussed and implemented with & # 39; & # 39 actively in, several degrees. The recent commitment of the G20 (with the United States as the sole rejection) to the Agreement & # 39; Paris will act to resolve the source of the problem by reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. Pull CO2 from the atmosphere and ssakkarha in the Earth's crust, called CO2 sequestration, has been implemented and deployed. For example, Royal Dutch Shell has built large facilities & # 39; carbon sequestration with the Canadian and Australian governments.

The third method, which blocks the sunlight was controversial in the scientific community for decades & # 39; years. The controversy lies in the inability to fully understand the consequences of & # 39; partially blocking the sunlight. Reducing global temperature is well understood and expected, however, remain & # 39; questions about the impact of & # 39; this method models & # 39; precipitation, ozone and crop production & # 39; globally.

The illustration of the balloon system the team & # 39; Harvard will use to extract calcium carbonate in the stratosphere.projects.iq.harvard.edu

This is precisely why the team & # 39; research & # 39; Harvard intends spray particles & # 39; tiny chalk (calcium carbonate) in the stratosphere at & # 39; controlled experiment. Computer models can only go to the & # 39; now to predict the impacts of & # 39; this geo-engineering techniques, it is time to test real world. With funding in part by Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, the team & # 39; Harvard starts answering the remaining questions as early as in spring 2019.

While the potential adverse effects are not fully characterized, the ability to control the Earth's temperature by spraying tiny particles in the stratosphere is an attractive solution mainly because of its cost. The recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimated that the continuous release of particles in the stratosphere can & # 39; offset 1.5 ° C & # 39; Heating for $ 1 billion to $ 10 billion a year.

When you compare these costs with the overall reduction in the use of fossil fuels or carbon sequestration, the method becomes very attractive. Thus, scientists, government agencies and independent founders & # 39; this technology must balance the cheapest and effectiveness & # 39; this method with potential risks for crops & # 39 Overall, weather conditions and drought. At the end of the day, the only way to fully characterize the risks is to perform real-world experiments, as are boarding the team & # 39; Harvard.

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