Saturday , December 4 2021

carbohydrate load: The science teacher & # 39; Edmonton Field go back to school for lessons on carbohydrates



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The graduate student Quinn McCashin instructed on the Canadian Network Glyomics who had a workshop & # 39; throughout the day for 40 teachers & # 39; Secondary school & # 39; Edmonton area about carbohydrates and indeed ideological ways to study them in science class at the University & # 39; Alberta f & # 39; Edmonton, 30 & # 39; November, 2018.

ed Kaiser / Postmedia

The teacher & # 39; high school were on the other side of the class at the University & # 39; Alberta on Friday with the possibility of having to research on carbohydrates being made in their own backyard.

About 40 area teacher & # 39; Edmonton participated in the program & # 39; daily activity and offers 42 practical lessons created by local teachers and researchers on glycomics, the study of carbohydrates in humans.

The workshop was hosted by GlycoNet, network & # 39; Canadian research has focused on supporting the study and teaching of glycomics and the University Center for Mathematics, Science and Educational Technology (CMASTE), aimed at helping local teachers bring x carbohydrate science at a local lens.

"We wanted to break down the barriers between what teachers are expected to teach some of the ongoing research in & # 39; Edmonton and f & # 39; Albacra," said the coordinator of the project management and Ryan -GlycoNet Snitynsky. "Today we emphasize both people and projects taking place in the street where many of these teachers teach."

The Canadian Network Glyomics had a workshop & # 39; throughout the day for 40 science teachers & # 39; Secondary school & # 39; Edmonton on carbohydrates and ideal ways to study them in science class at the University & # 39; Alberta f & # 39; Edmonton on 30 & # 39; November, 2018.

ed Kaiser /

Postmedia

Snitynsky said GlycoNet hopes that this pilot project & # 39; Alberta provides the model & # 39; models for students and help develop interest in the study of carbohydrates.

"We can not expect all these are carbohydrate scientists, but by & # 39; this experience as voters, citizens and taxpayers, they can have a deeper appreciation of the ongoing science in their communities and can analyze critical issues facing society ", he said.

Teachers of students learned about is becoming a research university is looking for tuberculosis treatments and foot & # 39; Alzheimer's through the study of glycomics as sugar are the first point of & # 39; contact cells for disease, explained Snisensky.

"If we can understand those types of & # 39; interactions, we can use that information to develop new treatments and new drugs", he said.

Teachers from left, Janea Kopp, Daniette Terlesky and Daniel Wispinski look at structures & # 39; complex proteins while attending the Canadian Network Glyomics who had a workshop & # 39; during the day for 40 teachers & # 39; secondary school & # 39; high school & # 39; Edmonton on carbohydrates and indeed ideological ways to study them science class at the University & # 39; & # 39 in Alberta, Edmonton, on 30 & # 39; November, 2018.

ed Kaiser /

Postmedia

After completion of practical activities to build structure & # 39; protein, the teacher of 11 biology and 12 Katie Teeuwsen said she hoped to bring the practical implications of carbohydrates in the body, such as blood typing and immune -response, back to class.

"It makes the kids more alert because in fact it affects b & # 39; any way", said the workshop & # 39; day created by a fellow teacher who spent three summers with & # 39; researchers at & # 39; six universities across the country. "There is more awareness & # 39; that you can & # 39; use in class because it developed from & # 39; before teaching."

GlycoNet, which began in U & # 39; A & # 39 now in; 31 institutions across the country, is hoping to expand the program & # 39; workshop for other provinces and also help to translate science carbohydrates for high school students.

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