Saturday , July 24 2021

The styles & # 39; Western life pose a risk to health of migrants, says the WHO report | society



According to a World Health Organization study, culture and Western society pose more health risks for migrants and refugees to make to host nations.

The first report on refugee and health of migrants in the west by WHO Europe suggests that those newly arriving are f & # 39; at risk of illness while they are in transit to another country, but face other hazards arrival f & # 39; host country because conditions & # 39; unsuitable living healthy, poor diet and obesity epidemic.

The report on the refugee health and migrants in the European region of the WHO says that transmit diseases or places a disproportionate burden on the health care systems, and calls on countries to take decisions on the provision of & # 39; services to migrants based on facts, rather than politics or prejudice. .

Dr. Santino Severoni, the coordinator of public health and migration to Europe WHO, said: "This report is a wonderful opportunity to spread false myths, misperceptions and negative narrative.

"Health is very politicized and used as a tool & # 39; & # 39 ;, but fear this report is very sound facts and data coming from our Member States."

According to the report, international migrants accounted for 10% (90.7 million) of the population in the WHO European region. Just over 7% are refugees. "F & # 39; some European countries, citizens estimate that there are three or four & # 39; times more migrants than there actually is," she said.

The evidence collected by WHO suggests that migrants and refugees are less likely to be affected by non-communicable diseases such as cancer, stroke or heart disease, but their risk of developing such diseases increases when going f & # 39; most developed countries, particularly because they are & # 39; often living in & # 39; poor conditions.

While refugees and migrants are more vulnerable to infectious diseases when they are in transit countries, the proportion with tuberculosis or HIV varies widely. WHO Europe said: "Despite the widespread assumption to the contrary, there is only a very low risk & # 39; refugees and migrants transmit diseases to their host communities."

The report criticizes implicitly the United Kingdom and other nations charge to a homeland for health care by suggesting the best way to protect the health & # 39; those in the host nations and new arrivals is to provide universal health care and free.

F & # 39; December, representatives & # 39; more than 70,000 physician urged ministers to suspend regulations forcing hospitals to pay foreign visitors in advance for the treatment of & # 39; the NHS, while expressing concern about pregnant women being denied care and children who lose care for serious diseases.

The rules introduced in 2015 and 2017 under the policy & # 39; immigration "hostile environment" specifying where foreign visitors should be imposed to receive NHS care.

Dr. Zsuzsanna Jakab, the WHO regional director for Europe, said: "As migrants and refugees more vulnerable than the host population to the risk of developing non-communicable and communicable diseases, it is necessary to receive access f & # 39; during which a health & # 39; quality services.

"This is the best way to save lives and reduce treatment costs, as well as to protect the health of citizens residing."

The report also found:

  • Refugees and migrants are f & # 39; lower risk of all forms of & # 39; cancer, but are more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage.

  • Depression and anxiety are more common among refugees and migrants from the host populations.

  • Unaccompanied minors are vulnerable to sexual exploitation and experiencing higher rates of & # 39; depression and symptoms & # 39; disorder & # 39; post-traumatic stress.

  • The migrant men experience much more work-related injuries from non-migrant workers.

The authors of the report requested to European nations to provide health care & # 39; good quality and accessible to migrants and all refugees regardless of their legal status, and make affordable health systems culturally and linguistically.

Severoni said: "Countries tend to use cost as a justification to limit or delay access to health care for newcomers and providing access & # 39; emergency only. But this is not cost-effective, early detection cost less than delay treatment until absolutely necessary in the hospital. "


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