Wednesday , October 20 2021

The MRI scans can & # 39; predict the risk of dementia before symptoms appear: Study



[ad_1]

RI brain scans can & # 39; help predict whether a person develops dementia in the next three years, before they appear the symptoms of the disorder, scientists have found.

In a study, researchers from the University & # 39; and Washington University & # 39; California San Francisco in the United States used a scan of imaġina magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to predict dementia with & # 39; 89 percent accuracy.

The findings suggest that doctors may one day be able to use available test b & # 39; & # 39 as widely, to tell people their risk of developing dementia before symptoms arise.

"Right now it is difficult to say whether an elderly person b & # 39; normal cognition or b & # 39; mild cognitive impairment x & # 39; likely to develop dementia," said Cyrus A rays, an assistant professor at the University & # 39 Washington,.

"We we have demonstrated that a single scan & # 39; MRI can & # 39; predict dementia average of & # 39; 2.6 years before memory loss is clinically attractive, can & # 39; help lit- doctors advise and treat their patients, "said Raji.

Although m & # 39; there is no drug available to prevent or delayed the onset of disease & # 39; Alzheimer's, identification & # 39; those contained in & # 39; high risk of developing dementia in the next few years still can & # 39; & # 39 be; benefit, researchers said.

People can make decisions about financial arrangements and & # 39; living while still in full control of their faculties.

The researchers analyzed MRI scans for physical signs of & # 39; looming imminent decline.

They used a technique called the diffusion tension imaging to assess the strength of the white matter of the brain, including the cables that allow different parts of the brain to talk to & # 39; other.

"The image of tension diffuser is a means of measuring the movement of molecules & # 39; water throughout the white matter" material, said Raji.

"If the molecules & # 39; the water does not move normally suggest underlying damage to white bands who can claim problems with cognition", he said.

The use of & # 39; information from the Initiative & # 39; Disease Neuroimaging of & # 39; Alzheimer's – collect data multisite collaboration, funding and expertise to improve clinical trials for disease & # 39; Alzheimer's – researchers identified 10 people whose cognitive skills declined over & # 39; years and compared those by age and sex b & # 39; 10 people skills & # 39; care remained constant .

The average age of people in both groups was & # 39; 73. Then, the researchers analyzed scans & # 39; spread & # 39; MRI spread just before the period & # 39; 20 years for all persons.

The researchers found that people went to experience cognitive decline were significantly more signs of & # 39; damage to their white matter.

The researchers repeated their analysis in & # 39; separate sample & # 39; 61 a person, using the & # 39; A more refined measure & # 39; white matter integrity.

B & # 39; this new analysis, they could predict cognitive decline with & # 39; 89 percent accuracy when looking at the whole brain. When the researchers focused on specific parts of the brain that & # 39; likely show damage, accuracy rose to 95 percent.

"We can say that individuals who then developed dementia have these differences on MRI dissemination, compared with & # 39; scans & # 39; normal cognitive persons memory and skills & # 39; thinking remained intact ", said Raji.

[ad_2]
Source link